<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;
      charset=windows-1252">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    <p>On 1/26/18 7:25 PM, Shane Weier wrote:<br>
    </p>
    <blockquote type="cite"
cite="mid:MEAPR01MB2694C1758BC3F65B5CCB469284E70@MEAPR01MB2694.ausprd01.prod.outlook.com">
      <p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0"><span>&gt;Unless its
          Navarre and verdun, The whole unit and personal markings would
          be for other aircraft. 
          <br>
        </span></p>
      <p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0"><span><br>
        </span></p>
      <p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0"><span>Which is an acute
          observation. AIr combat happens in
          <u>three</u> dimensions.  Even a turning duel exposes the
          undersides of a banking aircraft to others at the same level
          who might be tempted to a deflection shot. Better it be made
          clear from every direction just who is who.</span></p>
      <p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0"><span><br>
        </span></p>
    </blockquote>
    Greg VanWyngarden has a couple of Osprey titles that discuss Jasta B<br>
    planes and pilots.  The profiles are by Harry Dempsey and, as usual,<br>
    none show the undersides of aircraft.  However, there's an
    interesting<br>
    passage in <i>Jagdstaffel 2 'Boelcke'</i> on pages 88-90 about the
    genesis<br>
    of unit markings:<br>
    <br>
    "... It will be noted that Bäumer's Dr I 204/17 had a large Iron
    Cross<br>
    insignia painted on the horizontal stabiliser, along with most of
    the<br>
    triplanes in <i>Jasta</i> 36 and possibly (initially) Papenmeyer's
    Dr I 214/17.<br>
    It would seem that the other German pilots had mistakenly attacked<br>
    some of the triplanes in the 4. <i>Armee</i>, and these additional
    markings<br>
    were an attempt to improve their recognition.  Josef Jacobs later<br>
    explained:<br>
    <br>
    ' As the Fokker Dr I came into service over the Front, they were
    often<br>
    thought to be British Sopwith Triplanes by inexperienced German<br>
    pilots who often "had a go" at a Fokker Dr I in the heat of battle. 
    The<br>
    most critical time was in the late afternoon and early evening, when<br>
    the surface of the upper wings and the fuselage strongly reflected
    the<br>
    light, making it nearly impossible to distinguish the national
    markings.'<br>
    <br>
    In any case, most of the national insignia on tailplanes were over-<br>
    painted when the <i>Jasta</i> 'Boelcke' unit markings were
    applied.  Since the<br>
    beginning of 1918, the old unit insignia of white tails had been
    changed<br>
    to half white/half black tails, with the centre line of the fuselage
    being<br>
    the demarcation point.  The new black and white colours of the <i>Jasta<br>
    </i>were also applied to the cowlings in distinctive style.  This
    permitted the<br>
    aircraft of <i>Jasta</i> 'Boelcke' to be identified from any angle,
    especially in<br>
    large <i>Jagdgeschweder</i> formations.  For similar reasons, each
    of the<br>
    <i>Staffeln</i> in JG III were identified by coloured cowlings
    (along with other<br>
    unit markings) ..."<br>
    <br>
    From this, it seems the initial threat was being jumped from above
    by<br>
    green pilots.  Yet the "from any angle" comment might imply the tail<br>
    undersides were painted as well as the cowlings.<br>
    <br>
    Perhaps there's a decal sheet that shows what the consensus view of<br>
    earlier researchers might be?<br>
    <br>
    Kerry<br>
    <i></i><br>
  </body>
</html>