Re: DH2 anyone???

Erik Pilawskii (xopowo@u.washington.edu)
Thu, 22 Dec 1994 15:14:21 -0800 (PST)

Y'know, I have always thought that this blue was very similar to RLM 65
'Hellblau'. Since the idea, I would think, was to match the color of the sky,
I can see where they would tend to arrive at similar formulae.

To leap utterly off the subject, it has always been fascinating to me to
see the various blues used by each nation to paint their respective a/c
undersides, and compare these to the actual appearance of the sky in those
countries. Well, typically, anyway...(typically!!-- what a ludicrous
generalization!). For example, the color of the sky here in Seattle is
perfectly similar to that in Germany, say, from Frankfurt northwards. When
I look up I see many of the RLM shades: 02 Grau, 65 Hellblau, 76 Grauviolet,
etc. They appear just as they did in Germany when I lived there; the
inspiration for those colors is obvious.
The Soviets used a very deep, beautiful, almost-mid-blue for theirs. It
matches the color of the sky over European Russia to a 'T'-- during summer-
time, anyhow. The RAF used a pale blue with a greenish tint to it, very
much reminding me of a late-spring day in Southern England. The Chinese used
a dark, Russian-like blue, and the Poles a shade falling between this and
RLM 65, with a greyish hint. And etc, etc.

Well, to close this idiotically frayed loop, the foregoing would also lead
me to believe that the German blues of the two periods were similar. Perhaps
they weren't, but I've never seen anything definitive to the contrary. Any
of you guys know the *actual* answer, here? Mick?

Erik
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"The Heavens were the grandstands, and only the Gods were spectators. The
stake was the World. The forfeit was the Player's place at the table; and
the Game had no recess. It was the most dangerous of all sports-- and the
most fascinating. It got in the blood like wine. It aged men 40 years in
40 days; it ruined nervous systems in an hour. It was a fast game-- the
average life of a pilot at the Front was 48 hours. And, to many, it
seemed an Age....
Elliot White Springs, WWI ace
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